Can an electric field be infinite?

Can an electric field be infinite?

3 Answers. So there is no infinity. In two dimensions (or in one), the electric field falls off only like 1r so the potential energy is infinite, and objects thrown apart get infinite speed in the analogous two-dimensional situation.

Does electric field increase with distance?

Electric field strength is location dependent, and its magnitude decreases as the distance from a location to the source increases. And by whatever factor the distance is changed, the electric field strength will change inversely by the square of that factor.

Where is the strongest electric field?

The relative magnitude of the electric field is proportional to the density of the field lines. Where the field lines are close together the field is strongest; where the field lines are far apart the field is weakest. If the lines are uniformly-spaced and parallel, the field is uniform.

Which point is the electric field the strongest?

The field is strongest where the lines are most closely spaced. The electric field lines converge toward charge 1 and away from 2, which means charge 1 is negative and charge 2 is positive.

What is the magnitude of the electric field?

the magnitude of the electric field (E) produced by a point charge with a charge of magnitude Q, at a point a distance r away from the point charge, is given by the equation E = kQ/r2, where k is a constant with a value of 8.99 x 109 N m2/C2.

At which point is the electric field strongest WXYZ?

Electric field lines are closest in region Y. hence the electric field is strongest in region Y.

At which point is the electric field zero N C for the two point charges?

At which point (or points) is the electric field zero N/C for the two point charges shown on the x axis? 1. The electric field is zero at two points along the x axis; one such point is to the right of the -2q charge and the other is to the left of the +4q charge.

How do electric field lines represent the magnitude of an electric field?

The number of field lines leaving a positive charge or entering a negative charge is proportional to the magnitude of the charge. The strength of the field is proportional to the closeness of the field lines—more precisely, it is proportional to the number of lines per unit area perpendicular to the lines.