Can a less massive object have more momentum than a more massive object?

Can a less massive object have more momentum than a more massive object?

A less massive object can never have more momentum than a more massive object. Two identical objects are moving in opposite directions at the same speed. The forward moving object will have the greatest momentum.

When the force on an object increases so does its?

From Newton’s second law the force on an object is related to the acceleration. The acceleration is directly proportional to the force applied to an object. For an object whose mass remains constant, when the force increases the acceleration increases. When the force on an object increases, so does its acceleration.

How can a more massive object have the same kinetic energy as a less massive object?

Velocity is the influencing factor in momentum. Also, inelastic collision means that the objects will not bounce off after collision. Therefore, the speed of the more massive object will be the same as the speed of the less-massive object because of transfer of kinetic energy.

Does a heavier object have more potential energy?

The amount of gravitational potential energy an object has depends on its height and mass. The heavier the object and the higher it is above the ground, the more gravitational potential energy it holds.

Does a heavier object have more kinetic energy?

First, heavier objects that are moving have more kinetic energy than lighter ones: a bowling ball traveling 10 m/s (a very fast sprint) carries a lot more kinetic energy than a golf ball traveling at the same speed. It turns out that an object’s kinetic energy increases as the square of its speed.

How do you know if an object has more kinetic energy?

Anytime matter is in motion it has kinetic energy. The faster an object moves, the more kinetic energy it has. The more mass an object has, the more kinetic energy it has. According to this equation, what effects K.E. more the mass or the velocity?